LaTeX source code list, such as professional books

How should latex source code lists generate output similar to that of known books, such as the Spring Framework? I've tried latex list bags, but I can't generate anything that looks as beautiful as the following. So I'm interested in formatting instructions to generate an example like the following (Spring in Action from Manning Sample chapters ):

Editor in TormodFjeldskår With the help of, here is a complete fragment that can produce the desired appearance:

\usepackage{listings}
\usepackage{courier}
\lstset{
    basicstyle=\footnotesize\ttfamily, % Default font
    % numbers=left,              % Location of line numbers
    numberstyle=\tiny,          % Style of line numbers
    % stepnumber=2,              % Margin between line numbers
    numbersep=5pt,              % Margin between line numbers and text
    tabsize=2,                  % Size of tabs
    extendedchars=true,
    breaklines=true,            % Lines will be wrapped
    keywordstyle=\color{red},
    frame=b,
    % keywordstyle=[1]\textbf,
    % keywordstyle=[2]\textbf,
    % keywordstyle=[3]\textbf,
    % keywordstyle=[4]\textbf,   \sqrt{\sqrt{}}
    stringstyle=\color{white}\ttfamily, % Color of strings
    showspaces=false,
    showtabs=false,
    xleftmargin=17pt,
    framexleftmargin=17pt,
    framexrightmargin=5pt,
    framexbottommargin=4pt,
    % backgroundcolor=\color{lightgray},
    showstringspaces=false
}
\lstloadlanguages{ % Check documentation for further languages ...
     % [Visual]Basic,
     % Pascal,
     % C,
     % C++,
     % XML,
     % HTML,
     Java
}
% \DeclareCaptionFont{blue}{\color{blue}} 

% \captionsetup[lstlisting]{singlelinecheck=false, labelfont={blue}, textfont={blue}}
\usepackage{caption}
\DeclareCaptionFont{white}{\color{white}}
\DeclareCaptionFormat{listing}{\colorbox[cmyk]{0.43, 0.35, 0.35,0.01}{\parbox{\textwidth}{\hspace{15pt}#1#2#3}}}
\captionsetup[lstlisting]{format=listing,labelfont=white,textfont=white, singlelinecheck=false, margin=0pt, font={bf,footnotesize}}

Use it in the document:

\lstinputlisting[label=samplecode, caption=A sample]{sourceCode/HelloWorld.java}

#1 building

You can also perform other operations, such as selecting a new font:

\documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article}
% ... lots of packages e.g. babel, microtype, fontenc, inputenc &c.
\usepackage{color}    % Leave this out if you care about B/W printing, obviously.
\usepackage{upquote}  % Turns curly quotes in verbatim text into straight quotes. 
                      % People who have to copy/paste code from the PDF output 
                      % will love you for this. Or perhaps more accurately: 
                      % They will not hate you/hate you less.
\usepackage{beramono} % Or some other package that provides a fixed width font. q.v.
                      % http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/typewriterfonts.html
\usepackage{listings} 
\lstset {                 % A rudimentary config that shows off some features.
    language=Java,
    basicstyle=\ttfamily, % Without beramono, we'd get cmtt, the teletype font.
    commentstyle=\textit, % cmtt doesn't do italics. It might do slanted text though.
    \keywordstyle=        % Nor does cmtt do bold text.
        \color{blue}\bfseries,
    \tabsize=4            % Or whatever you use in your editor, I suppose.
}
\begin{document} 
\begin{lstlisting}
public final int ourAnswer() { return 42; /* Our final answer */ }
\end{lstlisting} 
\end{document}

#2 building

I wonder why no one mentioned it Minted Bag. It has better syntax highlighting than the LaTeX list package. Its use Pygments .

$ pip install Pygments

Example in LaTeX:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[english]{babel}

\usepackage{minted}

\begin{document}
\begin{minted}{python}
import numpy as np

def incmatrix(genl1,genl2):
    m = len(genl1)
    n = len(genl2)
    M = None #to become the incidence matrix
    VT = np.zeros((n*m,1), int)  #dummy variable

    #compute the bitwise xor matrix
    M1 = bitxormatrix(genl1)
    M2 = np.triu(bitxormatrix(genl2),1) 

    for i in range(m-1):
        for j in range(i+1, m):
            [r,c] = np.where(M2 == M1[i,j])
            for k in range(len(r)):
                VT[(i)*n + r[k]] = 1;
                VT[(i)*n + c[k]] = 1;
                VT[(j)*n + r[k]] = 1;
                VT[(j)*n + c[k]] = 1;

                if M is None:
                    M = np.copy(VT)
                else:
                    M = np.concatenate((M, VT), 1)

                VT = np.zeros((n*m,1), int)

    return M
\end{minted}
\end{document}

The results are as follows:

You need to use the flag shell escape with the pdflatex command.

For more information, visit: https : //www.sharelatex.com/learn/Code_Highlighting_with_minted

#3 building

For the R code I use

\usepackage{listings}
\lstset{
language=R,
basicstyle=\scriptsize\ttfamily,
commentstyle=\ttfamily\color{gray},
numbers=left,
numberstyle=\ttfamily\color{gray}\footnotesize,
stepnumber=1,
numbersep=5pt,
backgroundcolor=\color{white},
showspaces=false,
showstringspaces=false,
showtabs=false,
frame=single,
tabsize=2,
captionpos=b,
breaklines=true,
breakatwhitespace=false,
title=\lstname,
escapeinside={},
keywordstyle={},
morekeywords={}
}

It looks like this

#4 building

To glance at algorithms Package, especially the algorithm environment.

#5 building

Try the lists bag. This is an example of how I used colored Java lists a while ago:

\usepackage{listings}

[...]

\lstset{language=Java,captionpos=b,tabsize=3,frame=lines,keywordstyle=\color{blue},commentstyle=\color{darkgreen},stringstyle=\color{red},numbers=left,numberstyle=\tiny,numbersep=5pt,breaklines=true,showstringspaces=false,basicstyle=\footnotesize,emph={label}}

[...]

\begin{lstlisting}
public void here() {
    goes().the().code()
}

[...]

\end{lstlisting}

You may want to customize it. The list package has several references. Just Google them.

Tags: Java Spring Fragment xml

Posted on Sat, 14 Mar 2020 12:27:26 -0400 by _off_axis_